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The Endangered Species of Pleasanton, Texas

so rare that they have never been seen!



Wooden Fort

It is believed that early settlers at Pleasanton built a wooden fort
for protection against maurading mastodons



Pleasanton's Endangered Mammal


Mastodon embedded in ice

Some people claim that mastodons are prone to freezing in ice



Mastodons are about as common in Pleasanton as the legendary T. Rex, and that makes them about as endangered as a species can be. But long ago rumors spread that mastodons were discovered frozen in ice, and ever since then Pleasantonians have lived in fear of winter. "You just never know," explained Merle Alouette, "when you might wake up one morning after a blue norther moves through and find ice outside. My .357 Weatherby will drop a Cape Buffalo at 300 yards, but I don't know how effective it is against mastodons." Does the mastodon really deserve to be on the endangered species list? "Of course they're endangered," claims Merle's sister Elouise. "There's so few of 'em left that you might go a whole lifetime and not see even one!" Others think they're already extinct. "I ain't never seen a manatee," offered Merle, "but that don't mean they're extinct." And so, the debate rages....



Pleasanton's Endangered Fish


Humuhumunukunukuapua'a

Some people claim that Pleasanton's humuhumunukunukuapua'a reminds them of Hawaii



Pleasanton's endangered fish is the extremely colorful humuhumunukunukuapua'a, a member of the triggerfish family. The humuhumunukunukuapua'a (pronounced who-moo-who-moo-noo-koo-noo-koo-ah-poo-ah-ah), which the locals simply call the humuhumunukunukuapuaa (dropping the final accent), is so rare in Pleasanton that it has never been seen there. Indeed, the entire membership of the Pleasanton Scuba Diving Club and Snorkling Association has combed the Atascosa River tirelessly looking for the beloved humuhumunukunukuapua'a without success. Some people (we call them skeptics) believe the humuhumunukunukuapua'a is extinct in Pleasanton, but others simply believe the fish is off vacationing somewhere very far away. But all true Pleasantonians keep an eye out at the riverbank for the elusive and rare humuhumunukunukuapua'a, for when it is finally sighted it will be a cause for wild and jubilant celebration.



Pleasanton's Endangered Flower


Edelweiss

Some people claim that Pleasanton's edelweiss reminds them of the Alps



Pleasanton's endangered flower is "the queen of the mountain flowers," the "noble and white" edelweiss. The edelweiss is so rare in Pleasanton that no known photo of it exists. The sketch you see above was drawn on an Eckto-Sketch 2000 by Pleasanton's resident naturalist artist, Audi Audubon. The edelweiss is a woolly flowering plant that grows high in the rocky cliffs of the Austrian and Bavarian alps and in Pleasanton, Texas. In the alpine tradition, one says that "Nur die Elite kann edelweiss erreichen" (only the elite can reach the edelweiss). The connotation and innuendo is that only the experienced mountain climbers--the elite--can climb up to the edelweiss. The Texas tradition is somewhat different. Here it is said, "Only patience and luck can find an edelweiss in Pleasanton," for, in truth, no one ever has.



This page was last updated
March 20th, 2003 by Jack Keller of Pleasanton, Texas.




[ Pleasanton's Home Page ] [ Facts About Pleasanton ] [ Pleasanton's History ] [ Festivals and Culture ] [ Pleasanton's Endangered Species ]
[ Birthplace of George Strait ] [ Atascosa River Park ] [ Presidio del Pleasanton ] [ Tower of the Americas ] [ Pleasanton Botanical Gardens ] [ Pleasanton Zoo ]
[ The Kellers' Oak Forest Home ] [ Jack Keller's Winemaking Home Page ] [ Jack Keller's Making Wines in Texas ] [ Jack Keller ]




No mastodons, humuhumunukunukuapua'a or edelweiss were injured or killed in the making of this web page.